Equity-Informed Practice

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Interrogating Whiteness in Early Intervention

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Overview

Overview

For White early intervention practitioners, it is critical to examine the role that systemic racism and whiteness plays in work with children and families. This session will open a dialogue on how and where racism enters into the early intervention system and what we can do about it.

Faculty & P-5 Competency Domains

Faculty: Ashley Cattaneo, MSEd, NYC Department of Education; Marjorie Brickley, MSEd, Bank Street College

P-5 Competency Domains: 

  • P-5 (5) Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness
  • P-5 (7) Professional and Ethical Practices
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Presenters have affirmed that they do not have proprietary interest in products, instruments, devices, services or materials discussed in this event, and have confirmed that they have not been compensated in relation to this presentation.

Infants and Toddlers Face Racism Too: Science, Practice, and Policy

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Overview

Overview

This Issue Intensive, facilitated by Kandace Thomas, PhD, will explore how racism affects America’s youngest residents–infants and toddlers. The first session will present the extant research on how infants and toddlers perceive race, particularly through facial recognition. It will also include a review of the research on how historical trauma due to race affects families of very young children and what this means for the development of infants and toddlers. The second session will entail an interactive discussion on current issues relevant to systemic racism and racial inequity in the US and the implications of these for the functioning of infants and toddlers. Early childhood practitioners will gain new insights about how racism shapes our lives from our earliest days.

Faculty & Competency Domains

Faculty: Cynthia García Coll, PhD, University of Puerto Rico; Iheoma Iruka, PhD, The Center for Early Education Research & Evaluation, HighScope Educational Research Foundation; Kandace Thomas, PhD, First 8 Memphis; Marva L. Lewis, PhD, Tulane University

P-5 Competency Domains:

  • P-5 (5) Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness
  • P-5 (4) Health and Developmental Protective and Risk Factors
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Presenters have affirmed that they do not have proprietary interest in products, instruments, devices, services or materials discussed in this event, and have confirmed that they have not been compensated in relation to this presentation.

Culturally Grounded Approaches to Support Children and Families in American Indian and Alaska Native Early Care and Education: Lessons Learned From Project LAUNCH and Head Start

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Overview

Overview

This Issue Intensive will utilize an interactive discussion format and include several opportunities for participant participation. An overview of major early childhood programs serving children and families in American Indian and Alaska Native communities will be provided along with a discussion of the centrality of Native language and culture for supporting child and family health, development, and well-being. Tribal early childhood program leaders will share their experiences integrating Native language and culture into their programs, offering practical advice and lessons learned for others seeking to ground their early childhood programs and practices in Native or other cultural and language traditions. During the session, participants will be encouraged to share reflections, questions, and examples from their own experience of cultural and language integration.

Faculty & Competency Domains

Faculty: Dawn Nixon, PsyD, LP, IMH-E (IV-C); Ekaterina Zoubak, MA, Health Resources and Services Administration; Johanna Wilson, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Project LAUNCH; Lana Garcia, Pueblo of Jemez & Walatowa Head Start Language Immersion Program; Michelle Sarche, PhD, Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health

P-5 Competency Domains:

  • P-5 (5) Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness
  • P-5 (3) Relationship-Based Practice
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Presenters have affirmed that they do not have proprietary interest in products, instruments, devices, services or materials discussed in this event, and have confirmed that they have not been compensated in relation to this presentation.

Equity and Inclusion in Family Engagement Programs

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Overview

Overview

Family engagement efforts represent a shared responsibility in which early childhood/home visiting programs and other community agencies are committed to meaningfully including parents in the development of program services, procedures, and policies, with the goal of ensuring families have the support and knowledge they need to actively support their children’s development. Equity and inclusion—in the design and implementation of family engagement efforts—ensures that programmatic activities reach all families in the community and reflect a shared and inclusive set of beliefs, practices, and objectives. This Issue Intensive will explore the ways in which an equity and inclusion lens can, and should, shape family engagement efforts and feature an innovative family engagement program that has successfully partnered with a diverse group of parents at the community level.

(Note: Issue Intensive sessions are designed to be delivered in two parts. Part Two of this session is featured on the same day at 3:30 pm.)

Faculty & P-5 Competency Domains

Faculty: Eve Wilder, MPH, Massachusetts Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Project, Massachusetts Department of Public Health; Larisa Mendez-Penate, EdM, Massachusetts Department of Public Health; Roxanne Hoke-Chandler, MS, Massachusetts Department of Public Health; Shantel Meek, PhD, Children’s Equity Project, Arizona State University

P-5 Competency Domains:

  • P-5 (5) Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness
  • P-5 (2) Family-Centered Practice
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Presenters have affirmed that they do not have proprietary interest in products, instruments, devices, services or materials discussed in this event, and have confirmed that they have not been compensated in relation to this presentation.

To Thrive: Toward a Kinder, Greener, and More Just World for Young Children

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Overview

Overview

2020 began with long-standing challenges facing the youngest children and their families and promising visions of creating a better world for them. Little did we know then what the year would bring. To open the ZERO TO THREE Annual Conference we have asked Joan Lombardi, PhD, a longstanding champion for young children in the US and around the world, to reflect on the status of young children and families before COVID-19 as well as the impact of the pandemic, and to provide a call to action moving forward into a new and better future.


Faculty & P-5 Competency Domains

Faculty: Joan Lombardi, PhD, Senior Advisor & Director, Early Opportunities

P-5 Competency Domains: 

  • P-5 (6) Leadership to Meet Family Needs and Improve Services and Systems
  • P-5 (4) Health and Developmental Protective and Risk Factors
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Presenters have affirmed that they do not have proprietary interest in products, instruments, devices, services or materials discussed in this event, but have been compensated by ZERO TO THREE for this presentation.

Defunding Mindfulness: While We Were Sitting on Our Cushions, a New World Order Was Being Ushered In

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Overview

Overview
On May 25, 2020, the world watched as White police officer Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd, a Black man, who had been arrested for allegedly using a counterfeit bill. Floyd was forced to the ground, face down, handcuffed, and was begging for his life saying “I can't breathe” and calling for his mother, while Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly 9 minutes before he died. On May 26, 2020, demonstrations began to protest Floyd's murder and the murder of other Black people and people of color by the police. The protests have transformed into direct action to topple systemic racism and white supremacy. Racist monuments and statues of white supremacists have been torn down or removed; the Confederate flag is now longer allowed in car racing sports or in the U.S. military; the names of white supremacist leaders and donors are being removed from school and university buildings; and professional sports teams have begun reversing their opposition to players, such as Colin Kaepernick, who kneel during the U.S. national anthem to bring calls to stop the murder of Black people and police brutality. 

Meanwhile, where has the mindfulness movement been in this revolution? What have we done to directly confront systemic racism, white supremacy, and colonization? Should we defund the present mindfulness movement and declare it another pillar of white supremacy? Should we fiercely interrogate the value of concepts such as compassion, self-awareness, and the right intention? In this time in history we are in a period of decolonization, in what Dr. Franz Fanon, the French West Indian psychiatrist, termed "A Dying Colonialism." In his ground-breaking book, The Wretched of the Earth, Fanon declared that decolonization must always be a violent phenomenon because "resisting a colonizing power using only politics will not work." How can we become allies in breaking down the icons, structures, and processes of settler colonialism and systemic racism? And, it is possible to envision a new mindfulness, a decolonized mindfulness?

Faculty & P-5 Competency Domains

Faculty: Michael Yellow Bird, MSW, PhD, Dean and Professor Faculty of Social Work, University of Manitoba

P-5 Competency Domains:

  • P-5 (6) Leadership to Meet Family Needs and Improve Services and Systems
  • P-5 (5) Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness
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Presenters have affirmed that they do not have proprietary interest in products, instruments, devices, services or materials discussed in this event, but have been compensated by ZERO TO THREE for this presentation.